Good News According To The Bible – Jerome, Wycliffe, Tyndale, Martin Luther, King James

The oldest manuscript of the Christian Bible is the Codex Sinaiticus .

Christian scholars are still working on when the Christian Bible was first published. (See The First Edition of the New Testament.)

Most English Bibles today trace their roots to King James’ version of the Bible. The King James version was a sanitized version of William Tyndale’s direct translation.  The church killed Tyndale for updating the Bible  from Latin by translating  from the early scriptures which were originally written first in Hebrew and then in Greek (the “lingua franca” or main language of that time period).

After the Roman Empire itself was Christianized and Latin become the common language, the entire Bible was translated into Latin. The first Latin version is called the Vulgate. Jerome wrote the first Latin Bible by translating directly from Hebrew and Greek around 360 AD. However,  as a student in Rome, Jerome engaged in the homosexual activities (wikipedia) of students there, which he indulged in quite casually but suffered terrible bouts of repentance afterwards. To appease hisconscience, he would visit on Sundays the sepulchers of the martyrs and the apostles in the catacombs. This experience would remind him of the terrors of hell.

St. Jerome has said, “There are five Gospels: Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and the land of Israel.”

In the mid-15th century, when Johannes Gutenberg invented movable type, the Latin Vulgate edition of the Christian Bible was the first work he printed.

Also, Martin Luther had a breakthrough translation of the Bible into demotic German. According to Elie Wiesel in in his book on Rashi he says that Rashi’s translation work into Latin influenced Luther’s breakthrough translation.

Now, you can hear exactly how Jesus would have prayed in his original language, Hebrew.

Is the word “church” even in the Bible or is it really a community of Israel? IschurchintheBible

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